DV12 low-level background noise

Is DV12 low-level background noise with no music playing normal?

For the most part, it is normal. In louder environments, it's not noticeable. At a party or event, it won't be noticed. When high-gain electronics are connected to high-sensitivity loudspeakers, sometimes the lowest level of the amplifier's output, it's "idle level" is audible because the speaker is very sensitive. The reason it's audible from the horn and not from the woofer is because the horn is much more sensitive than the woofer.  The same amount of millivolts are going to both drivers but the compression driver and horn are much more efficient at converting those millivolts into sound pressure.

There is a maximum dynamic range between the lowest level an electronic circuit produces and the highest level it can produce. For pro-audio gear this is usually in the range of 110-115dB. The output of one of those horns is ~115dB with 1W @1 meter. The amplifier channel can produce 1500 watts. Essentially the horn can produce 62dB from only 0.01 millivolt. We make compromises in order to get loud, and that compromise could be the inability to get perfectly quiet.

It may be possible to make it a little less noticeable in quiet spaces, and this would also improve sound quality anywhere you would take them... (This is what everyone should be doing anyway, but it's particularly relevant here...) Try turning down the input level on the cabinet. First, turn it all the way down and see if the noise is reduced. If it is, then we're making progress. Next, put some music through your mixer and bring the mixer's output level up until it's at 98% of maximum. Yes, really high. Now, bring the level on your speakers up just enough to reach the maximum sound level you'll want in the room. With that done, you'll no longer be amplifying background noise for no reason. You won't be amplifying background noise from any source, amp, mixer or whatever. Your mixer won't struggle to produce enough output to play the speakers as loud as you want. Mixers have way more output than you need and they tend to sound better when they are delivering more output rather than less.


    • Related Articles

    • Sound level issues for an overnight, outdoor festival.

      Outdoor festival production faces many challenges but one of the most difficult to manage is noise pollution. Bass, aka low-frequency noise propagation, generates the most complaints from local residents. Festivals don't tend to invest in the ...
    • My speaker or subwoofer is popping! Is it broken? What can I do?

      Hearing a "popping" sound? You may need to update your firmware. Still having issues? Submit a ticket here for personalized support. What are other reasons I might hear this sound? Crappy speaker poles: When standard speaker poles are used, the ...
    • Below 20Hz - Does any music actually use it?

      Q: I see a lot of subs marketing below 20Hz but there is very little musical or movie information there correct? Your subs roll off at 27Hz or so. Is that due to driver selection or DSP limitation ? What dB are your VS21 or DJ118 outputting below ...
    • Why are the frequency responses lower for pairs of subwoofers than single subs?

      If you have a loudspeaker that’s operating at its bottom limit, and then you supply another box to assist that first box, collectively their bottom limit extends lower. That effect is true for any subwoofer and subwoofer pair. When you put multiple ...
    • Sound in a swimming pool?

      Q: I have another event coming up with an odd setup request... Inside of an abandoned "Olympic size" swimming pool. The depth isn't quite the same though. The venue mentioned that they set up sound and dance inside of the pool out of courtesy for the ...